PetrolBlog looks at: How Many Left?

These sort of websites should carry a government health warning. Not only did I lose half an hour of my working day when I discovered it via twitter, but I’ve just spent the last hour trawling back through my entire back catalogue of past motors. The website in question is www.howmanyleft.co.uk and be warned, you will lose hours on there.

But the information on there is genuinely interesting. Take this selection of 25 of my previous chariots:

Car Licensed SORN
1982 Daihatsu Charade XTE 3 5
1998 Daihatsu Cuore Avanzato 4 3
1981 Audi 80 GLE 6 0
1976 Saab 95 V4 32 30
1980 Ford Capri 2.0 Ghia 39 79
1989 Golf Rallye 39 76
1967 Vauxhall Viva 1200 Deluxe 62 64
1987 BMW M535i 90 135
1996 Audi S6 Avant 114 28
1989 Mazda RX7 130 293
1989 Citroen AX GT 131 198
1988 Saab 900 Turbo 160 36
1987 Ford Capri 280 162 173
1989 Land Rover 110 V8 218 74
2001 Volkwagen Passat V6 Tdi 374 8
1998 Honda Accord 2.2i VTEC 380 35
1986 Ford Capri 2.8i Special 442 793
2004 Vauxhall VX220 Turbo 615 136
2002 Vauxhall VX220 721 175
1984 Ford Capri 1.6 Laser 806 1083
1998 Honda Accord Type-R 1381 97
2005 Skoda Superb 1596 24
1993 Volkswagen Corrado VR6 1632 560
2004 Skoda Octavia vRS 4424 127
2001 Ford Puma 30931 1523

Listed in order of the number of cars actually licensed and on the road, the results are quite a shock to be honest.

I learnt to drive in a Daihatsu Charade XTE, so I’m a little saddened to see there are just three left cruising the streets of Great Britain. I had planned to find one for some kind of trip down memory lane. No great surprise to see the Daihatsu Cuore Avanzato in second place, but I really didn’t appreciate just how rare they are. I know of more than the number listed though, so I’m wondering if unofficial imports are listed separately? Answers on a postcard.

My old Audi 80 is also an endangered species, but judging by the condition of the one I was forced to sell for spares, this comes as no great surprise.

Of the current PetrolBlog fleet, the Audi S6 is the rarest with 114 on the road, then the Citroen AX GT with 131, the Land Rover with 218 and then the Honda Accord 2.2i VTEC. That the Accord is the most common member of the fleet isn’t a shock, but the relatively small number of them left is. A victim of the Scrappage scheme perhaps? But whatever, 380 isn’t a huge number and it’ll be rapidly decreasing every year. How long before it is rarer than the Audi or Citroen?

There aren’t many Capri 280s left, but there’s a rather large selection of Corrado VR6s on the road. Guess it helps when a car is listed as a modern classic even before it goes out of production. And talking of Volkswagens, I can’t quite work out the figures for the Golf GTis, so I’m unsure how my old MK1, MK2 and MK3 are fairing these days. Fair assumption that the MK1 will be the rarest, but probably holding firm these days.

Take your pick from a huge selection of Ford Pumas, although sadly I couldn’t get numbers for the Racing Puma. I can only assume this is because they were effectively standard 1.7 Pumas that were rebuilt by Tickford. Again, answers on a postcard.

If you want to take a trip down memory lane, visit www.howmanyleft.co.uk. Just don’t come running to me if you lose a few hours of your life.

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ABOUT AUTHOR
Gavin Big-Surname
The chief waffler and founder of PetrolBlog in 2010. Has a rather unhealthy obsession with cars from the 80s and 90s, and is on a one-man mission to collect the cars nobody else wants. Also likes tea and Hobnobs.

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