Bangerwatch: Volvo 480

You’ve seen Springwatch, you may have even seen Autumnwatch, but now PetrolBlog introduces Bangerwatch. It many ways it is much the same as the TV show, only without Kate Humble, animals or a primetime slot on BBC television. The idea is simple, PetrolBlog will hunt down interesting and increasingly rare cars that have somehow fallen into Banger territory. By giving them some exposure it is hoped that they will be considered as potential Bangernomics project cars and in some cases, saved from inevitable extinction. There are no hard and fast rules over what constitutes a Banger, but a price of sub £1k is probably a good place to start.

To kick things off, PetrolBlog looks at the Volvo 480, influenced in part by the recent test of the C30 T5 Polestar.

History of species

A pair of Volvo 480 cars on PetrolBlogThe Volvo 480 made its debut at the Geneva Motor Show in 1986 and at the time, it caused something of a stir. For a company best known for producing large, boxy and rear wheel drive cars, the 480 was quite a departure. It was a bit like Radio 4 replacing John Humphrys with Lady Gaga as the host of the Today programme. It was shaped like a cheese wedge, had pop-up headlights and the ubiquitous Volvo grille with the diagonal ribbon was discreetly positioned below the front bumper. Not since the beautiful P1800 had Volvo produced a car so visually striking.

But the cosmetics were merely the start of it. The 480 was actually the result of a major product planning project named Galaxy. In short, the project was rolled out with the single aim of building replacements for the 340/360, 240 and 740/760. The result was the 400 and 850 series. The 480 was born and with it, Volvo produced its first ever front wheel drive car. The company hasn’t looked back and today only builds front and four wheel drive cars. The 480 therefore has a place in motoring history.

The 480 was also the first true Volvo, if you exclude the 66, to be built by Volvo Car B.V, a subsidiary company based in Holland and more commonly associated with DAF cars. The exterior was designed by John De Vries, whilst Peter Hobury was involved with the interior, a Brit who subsequently went on to head up design at Volvo Cars.

Red Volvo 480 on PetrolBlogAt launch, the Volvo 480 ES was available with only a 1.7 litre Renault-sourced engine. With just 109 bhp driven through the front wheels, the 480 was no sports car. Turbocharging arrived in 1988 and took the power up to 120 bhp, so still not exactly a firecracker. The 1.7 unit was replaced by a 110 bhp 2 litre engine in 1993, but despite the modest increase in power, torque was much improved. Volvo teased the world with a convertible in 1990, but sadly or thankfully, depending on which way you look at it, the car never made it into production. By the time production finished in 1995, some 76,375 480s had been produced and Volvo chose to mark the occasion with a limited 480 run of Celebration models. Today they’re the most highly sought after models, but at the time they weren’t particularly well received. None other than James ‘Bangernomics’ Ruppert was quoted in Car magazine as saying;

And Celebration it was too, as Europe waved goodbye to the badly built, pointless, DAF coupe with an outrageous asking price of £16,500. That paid for the CD player, alloys, leather and a pointless hallmarked plaque glued to the dashboard.

But despite this, PetrolBlog thinks that the 480 deserves its place in British motoring history and right now, prices are at rock bottom. Time to go in search of a good 480 then?

Habitat

Today the 480 can mostly be found loitering around suspect suburbs, although there’s an increasing number being snapped by retro enthusiasts. This is highlighted in part by the vibrant community over at the Volvo 480 Club Europe, which claims to have 4,193 members and 4,342 cars on its books. Not bad. The vast majority of members are in the UK, with a whopping 1,626 listed on the site, compared with the next highest number of 642 in Holland.

What to look for

Bangerwatch Volvo 480 on PetrolBlogVolvo itself was quoted as saying that the electronics could be a little troublesome, stating that they “caused a fair bit of reliability problems”. This is backed up by the club who list the electric windows, the ‘Info Centre’, pop-up headlights and switches and buttons as key areas to check. Rust seems to affect the rear arches, bottom of doors, the area between the roof and windscreen along with a metal strip behind the rear bumper. The normally aspirated Renault engine is largely bulletproof, but the usual checks for loss of oil should be investigation. On the turbocharged version check for smooth running, but in general all 480s are solid, well built and with the right history, should be reliable. Usual Bangernomics checks apply!

Risk of extinction

According to howmanyleft.co.uk, the number of Volvo 480s is stabilising and the days of rapid decline seem to be over. There are 165 manual Celebration models on the road, with a further 44 currently SORN. The most common version is the ES model, with 285 running and 181 off the road. So with a total of 1,154 Volvo 480s on Britain’s roads, it can hardly be classed as an ‘at risk’ car, but with servicing and repair costs undoubtedly outstripping the value of the car, many will be endangered. One to watch.

Caught in the wild

Despite the relatively healthy number of 480s left, there are surprisingly few available to buy. At the time of writing this blog, I could find only 20 for sale on eBay, Car & Classic, AutoTrader and Motors. Prices range from £200 for an ES with long a MOT but an overheating issue, through to a wildly optimistic £1,750 for a quite lovely ES with 77k miles on the clock. But in general, you should expect to pay between £300 and £800 for a 480 and certainly no more than £1,000.

The PetrolBlog verdict

Rear of red Volvo 480 ES on PetrolBlogThere can be no doubt, the Volvo 480 is officially cool. It might be ridiculously underpowered, but look beyond this and you can have a genuine piece of Volvo history for about the price of a set of tyres on a C30. I mean, what more do you want? It probably won’t kill you in a crash, it will be far more reliable than other cars of this vintage and budget, it has a neat glass tailgate and oh, it has pop-up headlights. I’d go as far to say that the 480 is probably as interesting and desirable now than it ever has been. Volvo will claim that the C30 took the most influence from the P1800, but look closely and you’ll see just as much of the 480.

It’ll be a number of years before I get my hands on a C30 T5, but in the meantime I might just end up with a 480. Maybe even the one with the pointless hallmarked plaque glued to the dashboard.

More information

Visit Volvo 480 Club Europe or Volvo Owners Club.

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ABOUT AUTHOR
Gavin Big-Surname
The chief waffler and founder of PetrolBlog in 2010. Has a rather unhealthy obsession with cars from the 80s and 90s, and is on a one-man mission to collect the cars nobody else wants. Also likes tea and Hobnobs.

49 comments

  1. June 24, 2011
    adrian

    I get it. It is an oddball, but the swedish do go there own way. That alone is a good. The C30 is refreshingly unusual too, and not that practical either, you cant get a moose in the back…which to my mind is a good thing, and completely unlike my idea of a Volvo (nee ‘road block’).

    Reply
    • June 24, 2011
      MajorGav

      Ha! Welcome to the blog Adrian! I’m not the sure the C30 T5 would do enough to get you out of your beloved Porsches, but I think you’d appreciate the quality and sophistication. Maybe they’d do one in Jägermeister orange for you…

      Reply
  2. July 1, 2011
    Rafael

    It´s a bit of an oddity, but I find it a lot more attractive than the C30. Perhaps it´s because I´m getting old and I remember reading about the 480 in eighties car magazines when I was a child. Perhaps it´s because the C30 seems to me like cabbage patch kids´ car.
    Fantastic blog, by the way. Greetings from Spain!

    Reply
    • July 1, 2011
      MajorGav

      Thanks for the comment! How common is the Volvo 480 in Spain then? Numbers are holding steady over here, but values are ridiculously low. Will be tempting for some owners to scrap rather than repair.

      Reply
      • July 1, 2011
        Rafael

        Well, they were a bit expensive en Spain when new, but most of them were bought by elderly people, so they were well cared. Until the second and third owner came, that is…
        The 480 isn´t very common here, and, like in Britain, values are very low.
        Those not in the hands of Volvo enthusiasts ended up in scrapyards because of some minor issue.

        Reply
      • February 6, 2012
        streetracer112

        why would you want to scrap a volvo like this one. surly its old but why.

        Reply
  3. August 29, 2011
    TonyH

    I’m putting my ’93 480s back on the road, switching from the daily runner – a ’94 440xi. The 480 feels flimsy compared to the 440, but that’s in a Volvo kind of way which means it’s tougher than most cars! I hate the 480 driving position (it’s like lying in bed), the electrics …. what electrics(!) … the incurable rainwater ingress … but there’s something special about that shape.

    There are very, very few of these on the roads in Ireland. I have only seen one in the past 5 years in fact. The handling is fantastic (Lotus were involved in the design I believe) and to me this car is reminiscent of the Fiat X19 in terms of power. You can either go the sledgehammer approach and max out the speed with a car concept, or go for lower speed thrills. Like the X19, this car nails the latter. It’s like a go-kart!

    The next person who asks “is that a Honda Civic” is going to get decked!

    Reply
    • August 30, 2011
      MajorGav

      Ha. Nice summary! Would like to see an update when you get the 480 back on the road…

      Will resist any Civic comments…

      Reply
    • March 10, 2015
      tee

      just started a 94 in ireland should be finished has drove many a good man on the process

      Reply
      • March 24, 2015
        Gavin Big-Surname

        Good luck!

        Reply
  4. August 31, 2011
    David

    Great blog!

    I’ve had three 480’s and loved each of them. Unfortunately they didn’t love me back and were at times quite woefully unreliable. Still though they were really nice to drive with great handling and (despite what some others may think) look fantastic. I reckon there is probably no more than a dozen or so left on the roads in Ireland, as the previous poster said they are very rare. But unlike most children of the 80’s it is definately getting cooler 🙂

    Reply
    • September 1, 2011
      MajorGav

      Agree. It is certainly getting cooler with age… 😉

      Reply
  5. September 28, 2011
    Joseph

    The Volvo 480 is a car which I just have to own own one day – I just love the pop-up headlights above those Rover SD1-esque indicator lenses (I think David Bache was involved in the 480’s design at some point). Also love the way the glass tailgate seems to merge into the rear light cluster, as Volvo later tried on the V40. There are many rare variations on the basic 480: The Turbo (obviously); the 480 GT (limited to something like 240(?) cars); and the 480 Celebration (final run-out example limited to er, 480 cars). It doesn’t matter to me – i’d take any 480! Volvo may lay all the inspiration for the new C30 on the 1800ES. Don’t let them kid you – the 480 was looked at as well.

    As an aside, when I was undertaking a week’s work experience placement at a well-known Volvo specialist garage in Glasgow, a lovely 480 Celebration was in for a service (I helped to work on it). It was in beautiful burgandy red with full black leather. I can’t for the life of me remember the number, but the plate was there on the dash to confirm it was a Celebration. I don’t know if I am allowed to include the registration number, but it was an ‘N’ registration, and is still running strong.

    Reply
    • September 28, 2011
      MajorGav

      Now’s the time to buy one. I can’t see prices dropping any lower…

      Reply
    • January 3, 2012
      Hayley

      Hi, I wonder if you could tell me the name of the specialist garage in Glasgow? We have a Volvo 480 and are desperately trying to find a part for the rear suspension which Volvo no longer make. I’m hoping a specialist might be able to help me out.

      Thanks,

      Hayley

      Reply
      • January 3, 2012
        MajorGav

        Hi Hayley. I’ll see if anyone on twitter knows.

        Watch this space…

        Reply
        • January 3, 2012
          David

          Parts are best spurces through the owners club, http://www.volvo-480-europe.org, rather than through dealers or the like. There is one particular guy on there from Glasgow who is an absolute treasure of a man and will surely have the part you need. Best of luck.

          Reply
      • January 3, 2012
        MajorGav

        Volvo UK has been in touch. If you let me know the part required and your reg plate, they can look into this for you. Probably best to email me through the site at majorgav[@]petrolblog.com. Cheers.

        Reply
      • January 3, 2012
        Dave

        Agree with David, pop over to http://www.volvo-480-europe.org/forum for your parts request. glasgowjim will likely sort you out! It seems a crime that Volvo refuses to make parts for the 400 series – there are still a fair few about.

        Reply
      • January 31, 2012
        Joseph

        Try Volvomax. They are a well-known Volvo specialist in the east end of Glasgow. My father has used them for many years and they have a good reputation. Their contact details can be found at http://www.glasgowonline.co.uk.

        Reply
  6. November 2, 2011
    Van

    Little boys are stunned when you pop-up the lights for them! That sets the 480 apart from the ordinary cars.

    Reply
    • November 2, 2011
      MajorGav

      Indeed! The motoring world should mourn the passing of pop-up headlights!

      My small children have the same delight when they see the headlamp wipers working on the Saab! It’s so futuristic! 😉

      Reply
  7. November 10, 2011
    Carl Wright

    I own a 1994 480ES, with 36000 miles on the clock. I wanted a classic car that was safe. I feel a little bit like Marty McFly in back to the future when I’m driving it, it is so different from any other car that I have owned, my six year old son loves it. I have no intention of ever selling it, but I do find it sad that these cars are being broken up for parts, as they are worth more that way. Thankfully a few people are keeping them alive, but they are becoming so rare these days. If buying, you may find the later models better from an electrical reliability point of view, and also go for a green dipstick 2.00 litre, rather than a red, as they use less oil (and no you can’t interchange dipsticks).

    Reply
    • November 10, 2011
      MajorGav

      Blimey, that is low mileage. How has the mileage been kept so low? One previous elderly owner?!

      You’re absolutely right about them being broken for spares. Modern society has developed a disposable attitude to cars and, when combined the recent availability of cheap finance, it means that old cars become unwanted.

      But I think the tide is turning. Cars such as the 480 are becoming collectable…

      Reply
  8. January 3, 2012
    Dave

    I bought my 480 turbo two years ago for under £300. It had a cracked headlight and some minor scratches around the front bumper … and mouldy seats, but it’s a cracking little car. I’m afraid to say I’ve spent more than I probably should on it, but only really on wear and tear stuff (exhaust, bearings).

    Really I can’t recommend them enough. It’s a pretty decent car to drive – it rolls a lot but remains grippy and the turbo is easy enough to bodge-tweak to produce decent performance. I enjoyed driving mine more than the much-more-powerful Saab 9-5 Aero I had, it was just much more fun.

    Main points to check would obviously be smooth running, *all* electrics and wet carpets in the boot (tail lights need resealing) and passenger foot well (heater matrix). Aside from that, rust, particularly around the rear arches is like a cancer and progresses quickly if not treated.

    I said I’ve owned mine for two years. In that time I’ve passed ONE on the road. There’s something to be said for scarcity.

    Reply
    • April 29, 2012
      D

      I can guess why the seats were mouldy, the one I owned many years ago, when quite new, leaked water in like a sieve, carpets were always soaking, and the garage could never find where it was coming from. Eventually lost patience with it’s constant unreliability (and staggering cost to get it fixed) – well remembered as one of the worst cars I owned – and I had 3 TR7s over a period of years

      Reply
  9. February 12, 2012
    gordon

    I’ve had my volvo 480es automatic for a few years, and love it!
    35-45 mpg *18mpg if you really clog it, yes there are better cars but I would’nt get rid of it.

    148,000 on the clock which stopped 3 months after I got it..oh yes and thats the 2nd time round.
    uses no oil and flies through MOT’s.
    all parts to keep it mobile are available.

    I like the semi lying down seating and the heated seats!
    The troublesome electric display is easily cured but taking it out and giving it a clean with fine flatting paper, the fading rear light problem….I’m about to remove the back lights and replace the outer faded part with new perspex.

    What it lacks in bhp it makes up for with roadholding and braking.
    Cheers Gordon

    Reply
    • February 13, 2012
      MajorGav

      148k – second time around?! Wow!

      The MPG is good, it’s stopped depreciating and it has bags more character than the majority of new cars. What’s not to like?!

      Reply
  10. March 10, 2012
    gordon

    my old volvo 480es passed it’s MOT again today with flying colours……….apart from boiling up a bit of water while ticking over for ages while we were chatting, even got a free anti freeze top up!
    ps I had a few and seen lots of new and used parts on ebay
    oil filter 99p.bargain!

    Reply
    • March 10, 2012
      MajorGav

      Congratulations!

      Stories like boiling over while chatting are only possible with PetrolBlog cars! Vive la difference!

      Reply
  11. April 1, 2012
    gordon

    the bad new is I know have to sell it, I’m in a band an need something with more space in the back………..so £400…..any takers still taxed and 11 months MOT
    Cheers Gordon

    Reply
    • April 1, 2012
      MajorGav

      Shame. Hopefully you’ll find a buyer through PetrolBlog. 😉

      Any idea what its replacement will be?

      Reply
      • April 16, 2012
        gordon

        sold……… rover 416 62,000 miles £300

        Reply
  12. May 18, 2012
    Will Wilson

    My present 480ES 2.0 (my second) unfortunately has to go after 12years – need something to put 3 grandchildren in! But it’s been a great car, always reliable. If anyone out there is interested its only 96k, fsh and I’d let it go to a good home for £500!

    Will

    Reply
  13. July 9, 2012
    Ray

    Had a few of these little beauties! 2 two-tones (a fantastic colour combo of Turquoise *Peacock Vase Green* and Silver) and a little S that I passed on to a friend. Now on the hunt for another, and im hoping a little 2 ltr GT will be mine by the weekend *pray*.

    Quirky indeed, and even the 1.7 has decent mid range torque, a brisk drop to 3rd gear at 50mph will get you round that troublesome vehicle on a country road. ( I even remember from a standing start having a 2ltr Golf only sneaking past me at 70+ in 5th gear, as the power up to 4th gear is ratioed rather well)

    Loved the handling, sure they do have a little yaw, and the odd virgin corner can invoke the demon under steer, but a little tweak of the wheel will bring it back into line. It’s not a major issue in that respect, and there is plenty of fun to be had when you find it’s limitations.

    Drivers position is just so comfortable, and the adjustable steering column actually makes a difference. In addition the all round visibility is grand.

    Boot space is reasonable, but fold the rear seats, and push the front seats forward, throw in a sleeping bag, and smallish human can get a nights kip in there. Found this out when a camping trip proved so incredibly uncomfortable, and in a moment of desperation, I assembled my seating as above. My friends appeared rather envious to see me staring up at them through the tailgate come sunrise. 🙂

    As for issues, the electrics can be hit or miss, but I found my favourite second hand part was an alternator, or the (adjustable) mounting bolt which loved to shear, causing me on one occasion to drive 60 miles with a piece of 2×2 jammed in place to allow my journey homewards.

    Leaky tail gates are a guarantee, and it’s well worth checking for rust in spare tyre well.
    If you can see the road underneath, thats not a very good sign.

    Summer caused some slight problems with overheating, but as I live in Scotland, that was a rare problem.

    These cars love the cold and Winter driving! The ride height and fwd allowed decent traction in snow, and even the window wipers are slightly recessed under the lip of the bonnet to allow them to plough away heavy snow! Did I mention heated seats? They’ve got heated seats. 2 of them. Awesome.

    Other quirky little features include the ‘follow me home headlamps’ that will stay on for 30 seconds. The ring lit keyhole, pull the door handle and it lights up! The rear wiper comes on automatically when you select reverse and is synched with the front wipers, which in turn, will quicken on depression of the accelerator.

    Love these little cars, my BMW 525 is getting the heave.
    Hope to god I get the little GT!!

    Reply
    • July 10, 2012
      Gavin Braithwaite-Smith

      Great mini review!

      When will you know if the GT is yours?!

      Reply
  14. July 10, 2012
    jdstanton

    Excellent chatter ! 🙂 great to hear there is still some love for the ol’ 480’s. Struggling to find a simple front light cluster (and possible bumper) to get my simple S version back on the road. It will be great to drive again after 6 months of an R reg vectra! Will use the parts advice given above but if anyone else can assist will be grateful. 480s seem to be like marmite, and they do seem to be getting rarer out on the roads. (new-bee Jim !)

    Reply
    • July 10, 2012
      Gavin Braithwaite-Smith

      Well if they are a Marmite car, I’m definitely in the love camp! But then I also love Marmite!

      Good luck with your search for the light cluster…

      Reply
  15. August 27, 2012
    Peter F

    HI, I’m in London have an F reg 480 es, lovely car 50k on the clock but rear wheel arch rust problems. Any advice on who can fix greatly appreciated

    Reply
    • August 27, 2012
      Gavin Braithwaite-Smith

      Good luck with your search. Have you tried the 480 club?

      Reply
  16. June 6, 2013
    Greg

    I see in ‘Risk of Extinction’ you have quoted how many ‘es’ & ‘celebration’ models are still in existence but don’t mention the GT’s or Turbo’s….. do you have any info on them?
    I’m also curious, as I have just brought a 1994 GT model, does anyone know how much they where new back then, would be interesting to know.
    My 480 thoughts… I had a ’87 es back in ’89 – 2000 and loved it, now getting a ’94 GT version am in heaven. I know they suffered many flaws, but they are an absolutely beautiful car. Yes quirky, but I think a perfect match of Volvo quality, practicality, while being one of the few attractive Volvo’s, I shall be loving mine for many years.
    Ohhh and of course they are so comfortable, the best seats ever, as with back complaints I drove my prize purchase from one end of the country to the other (almost), 658mils in one day and suffered absolutely no cramps and aches… a delight to drive!

    Reply
    • June 6, 2013
      Gavin Big-Surname

      You’ll be pleased to know that your GT is quite a rare beast. Just 53 left on the road, according to How Many Left. This should help http://www.howmanyleft.co.uk/?utf8=%E2%9C%93&q=volvo+480

      I still hanker after a Volvo. The news that the C30 is being discontinued got me looking again. Seats to rival Saab in the comfort stakes?!

      Reply
  17. July 26, 2014
    Tony

    Well, 3 years on since I put the 480s back on the road. Problems? – not many, other than just about every gasket that could leak oil leaking oil. At one point the lights got a bit confused as well: one clearly ‘thought’ that it was up when it was down …

    I’d forgotten how much fun this car was to drive. There’s nothing like a twisting country road to make you feel like a hero in your 480! It’s so predictable and handles like it’s on rails most of the time. I can identify with the comment about understeer at times, though in fairness I think the bushes need replacing in mine.

    The only recent problems have been with the odometer and mileometer: they’ve gone on strike! Then again, this IS a 21 year old car, so it’s aged well (better than me :o) The pop up lights get pedestrians going too, along with the rest of the car. I think the 480 has truly gone through the “old car … whatever” phase and is now being appreciated properly. Buy a good one before they’re all gone!

    Reply
  18. September 15, 2014
    Balto

    Hi everyone.

    Great blog. Love the Bangernomics section.

    I write you from the sunny Valencia, Spain. I first read this post in June this year. I have always loved this car. I’m 37 yo and clearly remember 480s passing us by at my mother’s Peugueot 205CL. It was something over our budget.

    So tomorrow I’m to pick up my first 480. A Turbo one! Black, 148000 kms on the odometer, sunroof and various minor issues.
    ABS seems to go on and off, cracked front fog light, missing rear washer jet… Already got all the spares I need for 160 euros, so next week I’ll start my new 480 little restoration.

    I’m elated. Like a child, can’t wait.

    To keep telling the virtues of the beauty, Turbo models have three clocks on the dashboard showing battery state, oil pressure and turbo pressure! Having the clocks was not negotiable to me, so I had to go for a turbo version.

    Thanks Gavin and others for convincing me about purchasing a 480. Pop-up headlights, cool retro infocenter, clocks on the dashboard and, yes, the Turbo sign on the back makes this car officially cool.

    For something less than 1200 euros.

    Best.

    Reply
  19. October 25, 2015
    Max

    We have an 480S with an automatic and airco. More than 300k on the clock and since I got my license a couple months ago I still drive it around the dutch roads. Steers fantastic and doesn’t feel like it did 300k!

    Reply
    • November 4, 2015
      Gavin Big-Surname

      Brilliant. A testament to Volvo build quality!

      Any pics of said beast?

      Reply
  20. August 26, 2016
    Sigur Ros

    Great and lovely car! My father owned one from the late 90s until the early 2000s. I found it pretty cool back then and today I still like it and think it’s really a deserved cult classic. The design holds up pretty well and still looks rather dynamic (and way better than the C30 imho), the pop-up headlights are just awesome and so typical for their time, and some other unusual details like the grill underneath the bumper and the bootlid made of a single piece of glass only add up to its charm. Despite this, it’s also a sports car that’s pretty good for daily use as there is enough room for the front passengers (the space on the backseats was a bit cramped, but could also be used if necessary) and the boot has enough room for everyday shopping. They just don’t build cars like that anymore.

    Reply
  21. September 7, 2016
    Robert

    I had an E reg one years ago. I liked the funky styling and I always wanted one. Mine was just a normal ES but in most colours the bumpers were black and unpainted. However, the black ones had painted bumpers and so I got a black one. It was reliable for a while, but then it started cutting out shortly after starting up. I think it needed new h t leads, but I’d lost my love for it then and so I sold it. It was one eyed at times, when one pop up light would refuse to pop up, but the other one worked. The solution was simple, pop the bonnet open and slam it shut, lo and behold, it woke up the sleeping eye and up it popped!

    Reply
  22. January 20, 2017
    The Glove Box: Volvo 480 | The Radar

    […] yet.” To learn about the aborted effort to bring the 480 to the States, head over to Car Buzzard. Here and here are two more articles for general knowledge. That’s all from The Glove Box for now. Next […]

    Reply

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