Cool as Pug: Peugeot 505 GTi

You’ve got precisely ten seconds to find a cooler car for sale on eBay right now. Back in 1989, that’s the time it would have taken this Peugeot 505 GTi to reach 60mph and although a few fractions of a second may have been lost during the subsequent 24 years, the Peugeot 505 GTi remains as cool as Pug.

Just look at the thing. It’s the very essence of ’80s cool, so delightfully understated and yet overwhelmingly loaded with intent. Seriously, what’s not to like?

Peugeot 505 GTi for sale

It’s a rear-wheel drive (incidentally, Peugeot’s last rear-wheel drive car), 4-door saloon, in black with a gloriously discreet boot spoiler. If those front fogs and headlights were painted yellow, I’d be upsetting my bank manager and reaching for that Buy It Now button on eBay.

Now if I’m totally honest, I’d much prefer a pre-facelift model with the original 505 GTi alloys, but when there’s just six 505 GTis left on the road, beggars really can’t be choosers. And don’t give me any nonsense about no 1980s Peugeot saloon being worth £2,750. If a Ferrari can change hands for £17.5m, a 505 GTi is worth £3k of anyone’s money. Besides, if the bottom falls out of the classic car market, I’d much rather be sat on a £3k investment than a £17.5m one.

As far as PetrolBlog is concerned, the Peugeot 505 deserves far more respect than it currently gets. In the Peugeot 504, it had a tough act to follow. But a European production run spanning 13 years – even longer in China and Argentina – suggests that the 505 was quite a successful big saloon. It even spawned an estate version, with the 505 Family adding a third row of seats, enough to carry eight people. Who needs an MPV when you can have a 505 Family?

The 2.2-litre engine in the Peugeot 505 GTi was enough to help propel the French fancy to a top speed of 115mph, whilst the passengers relaxed in what Peugeot called ‘a cocoon of comfort’. It also boasted rear legroom ‘comparable to a Mercedes’ and offered electric windows, electric sunroof, central locking and…wait for it…a stereo radio/cassette with four speakers. Yep, that’s four speakers. Monsieur, wiz zeez speakers, you’re really spoiling uz.

Peugeot 505 GTi

This particular survivor is said to be in excellent condition and is offered with a fresh MOT certificate. There’s also the obligatory pile of receipts, invoices and old MOTs. Apparently the car’s original owner was a Japanese banker, proving that at least some bankers had good taste back in the 1980s. It wasn’t all big hair, big phones and shouty cars.

Right now, you’re either scrabbling around eBay searching for something cooler (give up now), or you’re rummaging down the back of your sofa looking for a few French Francs. You want this Peugeot 505 GTi, of course, so check out the ad here.

In the meantime, I’ll leave you with this classic ad from the 1980s. Times were clearly tough for the marketing department back then, because you never actually see the Peugeot 505 GTi move. But just check out those yellow headlights.

I did, and now I need a lie down.

Images © eBay

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ABOUT AUTHOR
Gavin Big-Surname
The chief waffler and founder of PetrolBlog in 2010. Has a rather unhealthy obsession with cars from the 80s and 90s, and is on a one-man mission to collect the cars nobody else wants. Also likes tea and Hobnobs.

11 comments

  1. August 20, 2013
    spownall

    I briefly had an electric blue one of those way back when. One of the most comfortable seats I’ve ever sat in. Not just a car seat, any seat 🙂 Get it bought!

    Reply
    • August 22, 2013
      Gavin Braithwaite-Smith

      Ha! If you insist.

      Interesting point re the seats. Could they really rival the seats in a Saab 9000?!

      Reply
  2. August 20, 2013
    Craig

    I saw one of these on Sunday but didn’t have a clue what it was. Very cool car.

    Reply
  3. August 23, 2013
    Darren Leslie

    You can buy red tints for lights, so there’s no reason why yellow tints can’t be obtained. Do it, do it now (he says, hoping Mrs Braithwaite-Smith doesn’t read this….)

    Reply
  4. October 17, 2013
    Fromematt

    Has anyone ever settled the yellow lights in the uk question ? googling it brings up a wealth of confusion. Could you just have ( even just for show ) yellow fog lights ?

    Reply
  5. July 25, 2014
    Martin B

    I am a long time fan of these cars. I had the first model, with 4 speed manual, running on CNG. Unbelievable economy, sheer brilliance of the ride and handling. Then 10 years of a 504, not so good handling, but pillowy soft suspension, and same lightweight, deadly accurate steering at high speed. I actually put my back out leaving for a long drive and was in agony. I shrugged and set off anyway. By the time I arrived, 400 miles later, my back was fine again.
    Later on I bought a 2nd gen 505 with ZF 4 speed auto box. Again, the contrast with the jap crap I had driven was palpable. A hovercraft ride, but with crisp handling and steering. Although the dash design was a bit naff – I thought the first model was more stylish. I had a Becker CD player, and should have been happy, but the autobox was not good, and when I got charged $900 to fix front end wear, I sold it.
    One of the many big mistakes of my life. I had a 405 and a 406 later, but neither was me, the magic wasn’t there. I now drive another piece of jap crap and I’m so unhappy!!! Bring back the 505, I say.

    Reply
  6. March 11, 2015
    jacques de morton

    Martin B.
    I can only echo your comments. Having previously owned a 505 GR, an early 504 and a 62 403, I recently purchased a 1985 505 GTi.
    The original owner was from Queensland and had obviously looked after and maintained the car correctly. The previous owner did not and so I am completely overhauling the car, as time and funds permit.
    Meanwhile, I am using the Peugeot as a daily runner. The 2.2 four cylinder motor is not as powerful as many petrol-guzzling six and eight cylinder bohemoths that beat me to the next red light.
    The joy of driving the 505 is in the roadholding and handling, whilst providing armchair comfort.
    Although thirty years old, my 505 can is still a superb car, enjoying many engineering features unknown to modern front wheel drive drones.
    Of course, when you return to your car in the park, the styling, shape and balance of the 505 brings a smile. Do not despair; many 505’s still exist, and their is a community waiting for you to join them.

    Reply
  7. May 12, 2015
    Brian

    I had a 89 505 a gtdt model with the 2.5L Turbodiesel 95bhp don’t know what the torque was but it sure could move. when I bought it it was then an eleven year old car with seventy thousand miles and no end of service history and it had been a one owner businessman owned car it was in immaculate condition both inside and out. I was a fan of these and had been looking a long time since for one but I was a fool too as when it needed its safety inspection it failed on the back end somewhere inside the rear wheel arch been kind of cracked and torn and apparently was a fault on some of these models, the testing examiner told me that I should go back to the seller and get my money back as it could not have passed the previous years test and this tear damage didn’t happen overnight, the seller would not agree on it or pay the cost of repairing it and then I had to go and get ripped off big time by the crooked mechanic welder that did fix it up . I replaced the worn metric tyres with new ones and they were very expensive but they looked cool with the original alloy wheels. it had a limited slip diff and it would never get stuck in the snow either
    one thing about this car i really likes was the very high fifth gear at 80 mph I am fairly sure that it was ticking over at 2200 rpm and even one man told me that it was one quiet diesel when on idle tick over. I kept this car for two years and really drove it hard because behind it all I guess I lost respect for it because of knowing that I foolishly payed too much for buying it and making it roadworthy. I blew the head gasket driving it at 115mph for 20 mile but still drove it for another six months with the pressure cap left off so as to avoid boiling it then a power steering hose blew so I got a knife and just cut the drive belt making it easy enough too steer finally got rid of it without any regrets when It got clamped in a residential only parking road and was took to the crusher I learned one thing and that is whenever buying an older car you most definitely have to get the car up on a lift and look at it thoroughly as it is what you can’t see that ends up costing the most
    I always liked the shark nose styling of the 505 but beside modern cars, all older cars with their thinner a,b and c posts and shallower tail ends and slimmer dimensions seem to look so vunerable even though the older styling is top class for driver visibility

    Reply
  8. August 14, 2015
    Frank

    Peugeot 505 GTi
    I happened to drive an 08 seater station wagon. 1992 model, with 2.2 gasoline engine.
    Fast enough, smooth ride, excellent comfort and plenty of legroom
    No car beats that.
    Do you know where i can buy one in a good running condition. ?
    Thanks

    Reply
  9. February 2, 2016
    Jasmeister

    Has one of these back in 1988. it was one of only 3 KAT body kitted cars. it was so different from the usual bmw/mercs and it was a real headturner

    Reply
  10. April 26, 2016
    Harty

    Oh how i wish i had my old 2.0 litre 505ti now.
    I had one of these as above with an auto box, it was a fantastic car, we used to call it the limo it had super swift acceleration never missed a beat and luxury that i only experienced years later in the now long gone Citroen XMs .
    we had paid £73 for it ,saved from a farmyard in Lancashire. what a brilliant car.

    Reply

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